Final Fantasy Pixel Remasters: Best and Worst Changes


The Final Fantasy Pixel Remasters provide a nostalgic update to some of the game’s most important JRPGs, but not all changes are for the better.

Final fantasy games have seen a wide variety of remakes and re-releases over the years, but the Final Fantasy Pixel Remasters are a little different. Each features completely redesigned 2D graphics, along with a host of other changes.

The first one Remastered pixel collection characteristics Final Fantasy 1-3, although each can also be purchased separately. These offer both an aesthetic facelift and various quality of life updates, making classic games more accessible. Square Enix is ​​also coming out Remastered pixel versions of Final Fantasy 4-6 in 2021, presumably with the same types of changes.

Related: Final Fantasy Games That Deserve Pixel Remasters

While the Final Fantasy Pixel Remasters are excellent remasters of some of the more prolific JRPGs, there are a few issues that prevent them from being the undisputed final versions of their respective games. Here are some of the best and worst changes in the Final Fantasy Pixel Remasters.

The best changes of FF Pixel Remasters – New Pixel Art


Fixed the strange font style of Final Fantasy Pixel Remasters

The most obvious change in the Remastered pixels is the graphics update. Each sprite seems handcrafted for a more modern look, but the pixel style still gives games a nostalgic vibe. It is particularly noticeable in the case of Final fantasy 3; this is the first time that the “original” 2D version has been released in English, as only the 3D remake of the Nintendo DS and its ports were previously available.

Best Changes from FF Pixel Remasters – Soundtrack Remixed


Final Fantasy Pixel Remaster font example

Probably the best addition to the Final Fantasy Pixel Remasters is the wonderful soundtracks remade. Each track of the three games has been revamped with an orchestral interpretation, often mixed with elements of rock. These are arguably the definitive versions of those soundtracks, and the music alone is a good reason to play the Remastered pixels.

Best Changes to FF Pixel Remasters – Quick Save Options


It might seem like small tweaks, but the new save options are a necessary quality of life change, especially since the Final Fantasy Pixel Remasters are on mobile platforms. Players can save at any time on the world map, in all three games, but the quick save feature is even more useful. Quick save is extremely useful when exploring dungeons, allowing players to create a save point that they can easily return to as insurance when facing tough bosses.

Related: Every Final Fantasy Game That Needs A Remake More Than FF7

FF Pixel Remasters’ Worst Changes – Police Terrible


The most disconcerting change in the Remastered pixels is the English font, which is sometimes downright illegible. Square Enix opted for a non-pixelated sans-serif font that groups letters together, making them difficult to read. Worse yet, the game doesn’t have the ability to change the font type. There are unofficial workarounds to fix the Final Fantasy Pixel Remasters’ font, involving the exchange of a few files to use the English font of the Japanese versions.

FF Pixel Remasters Worst Changes – Ignores content added in previous ports


Unfortunately the Remastered pixels contain no changes or additions from previous re-releases of the games, such as Final Fantasy I & II: Dawn of Souls or the Final fantasy 3 DS remake. Dawn of souls added four new dungeons to the first Final fantasy and one to Final fantasy 2, none of which is presented in the Final Fantasy Pixel Remasters. On top of that, none of the gameplay tweaks from these older versions are present.

Next: Final Fantasy Pixel Remasters Could Come To Consoles If It’s Popular Enough


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